http://premovic.com/branding-slovenia-%D1%81%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%98%D0%B0-%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%9A%D0%B0-%D1%81%D0%B2%D0%BE%D1%98%D0%B5-%D0%B8%D0%BC%D0%B5/
Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?
There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.
A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself. Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?
There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.
A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself. Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?
There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.
A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself. Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?
There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.
A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself. Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?
There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.
A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself.

Yet another referendum on Scottish independence is coming up.  If it passes, will the UK change their flag?  Will the blue and white diagonal Cross of St. Andrew be removed, leaving only the red and white Cross of Saint George and the red-and-white Cross of Saint Patrick?

There’s a case to be made that there is no need to, since the Union Flag (and its naval equivalent, the Union Jack) represents the union of the British and Scottish royal families, which are still well and thoroughly entwined.

A red-and-white flag seems to be the most popular design, but it seems a bit dull to me.  I prefer the idea of incorporating the black and/or the yellow of the Welsh Cross of Saint David, myself.

rosaluxmemeburg:

sensesfiannafail:

hey so since 4th of july is tomorrow, please be on the lookout for Ronald Reagan. he comes back every year this day to play pranks on young Communists

it’s all those flags people have out, he’s attracted to the to fulfil his insatiable hunger

I still think he isn’t actually eating that flag, just blowing his nose on it: http://alternateflags.tumblr.com/post/80145571691/veganbutt-sascoalition-obama-will-never-be

Literally, this time.

(via greatboobsfortheproletariat)

rfpigeons:

I like GSRD pride flags. Here’s what I’ve found so far. Some of these are very widely used, some are placeholders or proposals. This is an evolving list.
Note: GSRD stands for Gender, Sexual(ity), and Romantic Diversities. Other acronyms are GSRM/GSM with the “M” meaning minorities, and the far…

An interesting assortment of flags here.

TAKE DOWN YOUR GADSDEN FLAG

and put up this one instead.

Or else admit that the Gadsden flag doesn’t really mean anything to you, and you only ever hung it out so you could look cool.

Awhile back, I responded (quite inappropriately, but I hope amusingly) to Driftglass’ passionate declaration that unemployed people (like himself and like me) have no flag and no church, by designing a flag for the unemployed.
Well, I am no longer flying the flag of the unemployed, since I am now working at West Hills Assisted Living.
The Prestige Care flag is quite unattractive, I have to say, but their paycheck is a blessing on Kathe and me.
If I manage to get promoted within this organization, maybe I can consult with them on a better flag, eventually. Awhile back, I responded (quite inappropriately, but I hope amusingly) to Driftglass’ passionate declaration that unemployed people (like himself and like me) have no flag and no church, by designing a flag for the unemployed.
Well, I am no longer flying the flag of the unemployed, since I am now working at West Hills Assisted Living.
The Prestige Care flag is quite unattractive, I have to say, but their paycheck is a blessing on Kathe and me.
If I manage to get promoted within this organization, maybe I can consult with them on a better flag, eventually. Awhile back, I responded (quite inappropriately, but I hope amusingly) to Driftglass’ passionate declaration that unemployed people (like himself and like me) have no flag and no church, by designing a flag for the unemployed.
Well, I am no longer flying the flag of the unemployed, since I am now working at West Hills Assisted Living.
The Prestige Care flag is quite unattractive, I have to say, but their paycheck is a blessing on Kathe and me.
If I manage to get promoted within this organization, maybe I can consult with them on a better flag, eventually.

Awhile back, I responded (quite inappropriately, but I hope amusingly) to Driftglass’ passionate declaration that unemployed people (like himself and like me) have no flag and no church, by designing a flag for the unemployed.

Well, I am no longer flying the flag of the unemployed, since I am now working at West Hills Assisted Living.

The Prestige Care flag is quite unattractive, I have to say, but their paycheck is a blessing on Kathe and me.

If I manage to get promoted within this organization, maybe I can consult with them on a better flag, eventually.

No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world. No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world.

No theme today.  This is a “hard drive cleaning” post, since my laptop shows signs of being not long for this world.

https://www.youtube.com/user/blackacidlizzard

Anarcho-Capitalist White Supremacist … ?

That strikes me as a weird combination, sorry.

Update: It’s actually not the yellow and black of AnarchoCapitalism, but the orange and black of Mutualism [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutualism_%28economic_theory%29], which strikes me as an even worse match for white supremacy.

Not that I would ever expect logical consistency from a white supremacist.

The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot. The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.
Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.
The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.
When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot.

The 2011 film version of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1372686/] is, as a title card puts it, set in “a place calling itself Rome” — not in historical Rome nor Shakespeare’s idea of Rome, but a modern country with aspects of both.

Unlike historical Rome, this “place” has a flag, which is seen in momentary glimpses here and there, just as any national flag is likely to be seen in any war movie.  I was annoyed that the flag never appeared clearly anywhere in the film, although I was able to screencap some interesting images.  The decidedly non-historical interpretation of the Roman eagle which appears on the flag is also seen on a wall in one scene, and from that shot I was able to reconstruct a version of their “Roman flag”.

The barbarian tribe of the Volsciani also have a flag in this film, and an interesting one, and various flags are also seen in protest marches during the film.

When my parents saw the film Beastmaster [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/beastmaster/] they urged us to see it also.  The film itself was awful, they told us, both as a film and as an adaptation of Andre Norton’s novel, but they promised us it had “great eagle footage”.  Ever since, my wife and I have referred to a redeeming feature of something substandard as “great tomato footage”, “great eraser footage”, &c.  In the case of Coriolanus, though, the flag footage is the least of the things that I found enjoyable.  I liked it a lot.